Ian McCawley, Acuity PR explains why “The Big Mo” is Vital in B2B PR

Five Reasons Why “The Big Mo” is Vital in B2B PR

Ian McCawley writes ... It’s become popular for political commentators to talk of “The Big Mo” on the election trail. The concept of campaigns building up a head of steam, reflected in surging opinion polls, has been common parlance in US Presidential races for some time. 

It was also adopted ahead of the 2015 UK General Election (though no party really had it, and the polls turned out to be as useful as a bikini in the Antarctic).

Momentum – the Big Mo – is present in lots of other areas of life. Look at the Premier League this season. It’ll take a lot to stop Leicester City winning the title, simply because they have the wind in their sails with a few games to go (sorry, Foxes fans, if I end up jinxing you but the odds are currently stacked in your favour).

Many a battle has been won thanks to the juggernaut power of momentum. The same is true in business. Nothing builds confidence more than a series of wins. The snowball effect of one contract leading to another – often snaffled through the simple act of applying the elements that worked in one pitch to subsequent situations – is worth considering when plotting out a PR and comms strategy for the year ahead. Here’s how it can work:

  • Smile and the world smiles with you: A constant flow of good news and strong views will breed an audience of its own over time. People will recognise your company or spokesperson’s name in headlines. They may even start proactively seeking your opinions and looking forward to your next missive. Don’t see announcements as humblebrags though; find a way of creating a positive glow without plumbing the murky depths of Lake Smug. 
  • An informed team is a happy team: What works externally often has a halo effect internally. There’s an obvious feelgood factor for your workforce in telling the outside world about the good things going on at your organisation. A company only grows if it retains its staff and clients alongside regular new business. PR is a great way to motivate people while keeping them constantly in the know about what a great collective job the organisation is doing. 
  • Sanity not vanity: What you decide to go public with should always be of interest to your wider audience and, better still, of use to them. There was a debate on LinkedIn recently when someone posted a photo of his new-born baby, claiming the (usually) professional network could benefit from the personal touch. Now, being proud of my three daughters, I’m not saying there isn’t room for that somewhere on the Internet. But too many updates about your company’s charity jam festivals or office moves (yawn) will put the brakes on The Big Mo. 
  • Slave to the algorithm: The more your PR reflects the business’s central positioning, the better your natural search ranking will be. This means considering the tone of voice and specific language used in all of your online content. Be careful, as Google will be quick to pick up on a blatant piece of sales puff. Instead, well-crafted copy that gives something back to the reader while subtly extolling the virtues of your own organisation can leave everyone happy (particularly your digital marketing manager). 
  • PR isn’t a tap: Some people believe that ad hoc comms is the best way of balancing a limited budget with bursts of activity to maintain some sort of profile. In truth, a steady stream is more sustainable than an on-off approach. Certainly where external consultants or agencies are concerned an unbroken campaign prevents the need for constant re-education and planning with the client. This saves time and keeps The Big Mo rolling. You’ll probably even end up spending the same budget to greater effect if you avoid breaks in play. Your internal PR guys will tell you the same: structure a calendar of content and comms and they won’t be scratching around for things to say during a PR lull.

There you have it. Flow, impetus, propulsion, momentum. Describe it as you will, The Big Mo is as crucial to your organisation’s proactive PR as it is to political victories, championships and even the economy. Time to start the ball rolling?

Ian McCawley

Ian McCawley

Managing Director, Acuity PR

charnsitr / Shutterstock.com

PR : You have just 3 seconds to impress a journalist .. plus extra comment from Ian McCawley, MD Acuity PR.

5 Reasons Your Next Press Release Should Be Visual

Aaron Sarno 

You have just 3 seconds to impress a journalist.

That’s the average amount of time spent before they decide on whether to read or toss your press release. So how to make the most of that tiny window? Go visual. Having a graphic based press release not only helps you tell your news story better, but allows you to do it in a unique and personalised way. 

Graphics by Shutterstock